Bathroom Tips – Modern Bathroom Blog | Modern Bathroom

From design ideas to cleaning best practices, the Modern Bathroom Blog provides tips and tricks for creating or maintaining a beautiful bathroom.

Top Secrets For Adding A Dazzling Bathroom Sink



When it comes to bathroom design, every component is an opportunity to make a statement and add value — especially your bathroom sink. With so many bathroom sinks on the market today, there are plenty of opportunities to select the traditional or modern bathroom sink that appeals to you. Whether you’re designing your dream bathroom or staging to sell, here are some top secrets to keep in mind when shopping sink options. Whether you go with a traditional bathroom sink in a vanity you already have or opt for something bolder, you can’t go wrong when you’re armed with basic design principles and know how they apply to your home. With that in mind, here are the secrets you’ll want to know.

  1. Start With What You Have
    Just like a double vanity probably won’t make sense in a powder room, so too certain sinks won’t fit in your bathroom. Before getting your heart set on a certain style or material, stop and evaluate your space. Here are some factors to consider:
    • How much space you have. If you’re going to be fitting your new sink into an existing vanity, you need to know how much space it can accommodate, as this will limit which sinks you can choose. If you’re swapping out the whole vanity entirely, on the other hand, you’ll want to think about what size sink/vanity will work best in your space. Smaller bathrooms tend to work best with pedestal sinks or wall-mounted vanities; and large bathrooms with multiple users benefit from double vanities with twin sinks.
    • Bathroom style. Unless you’re remodeling your entire bathroom, choose a sink that works with your current bathroom’s style. A modern bathroom sink might be slick and eye-catching, for example, but it would look out of place in a bathroom that’s traditional everywhere else.
    • Sink holes. Sinks need faucets, and faucets come in different hole numbers: one hole, two holes or three holes. If you already have a certain faucet in mind, you can pick a sink to match it. If you don’t, choosing a sink with three holes is your safest bet — as it works with the greatest number of faucet options.

  2. Know What Styles Are Available
    Unless you’re already committed to a specific sink style, it only makes sense to explore the possibilities. From pedestal sinks to wall-mounted sinks, here are some of the main sink types available:
    • Pedestal sinks: Supported by a single column, pedestal sinks take minimal floor space while still providing an attractive, functional bathroom sink. They also hint at vintage style and work beautifully among classic bathroom elements like subway tile and bronze fixtures.
    • Wall-mounted sinks: Another way to save floor space with your sink choice is with a wall-mounted sink. Rather than standing upright on the floor like a pedestal sink, this kind of sink mounts directly to the wall, completely freeing the floor beneath it.
    • Drop-in sinks: Drop-in sinks do just what their name suggests — they drop into a countertop or vanity top, with a rim that rests above the counter and a basin that hangs below. Their biggest benefit is being so easy to install.
    • Under-counter sinks: Under-counter sinks are like drop-in sinks, except they stay completely under the counter, with nothing resting above the vanity top.
    • Vessel sinks: Designed to rest above the bathroom counter, a vessel resembles a large bowl, and it gets placed above the counter with a faucet pointing into it. Available in various designs and materials, vessel sinks can make a bold, modern statement in a bathroom.

  3. Explore All the Different Sink Materials
    The sinks you see at your local home improvement store are not a full representation of everything that’s available. Today’s market includes bathroom sinks in glass, cast iron, porcelain over cast iron, vitreous china and even stainless steel. Take time to explore all of these possibilities so you can be sure you’re picking the right option for you.

  4. Look at Sinks in Person
    One of the best ways to explore both sink styles and materials is in person. Visit a local design showroom, like the ones Modern Bathroom has in Southern California, and get a better feel for what you do and don’t like about various sink designs.

  5. Consider Universal Design
    Last but not least, think about universal design when you’re shopping sinks. While you may not need a handicap-accessible bathroom day to day, will anyone in your family? Would making your bathroom more accessible be an asset when it comes time to sell? One small step you can easily take is to install the sink as close to the front of your countertop or vanity as possible.
Ready to learn more about sinks and shop affordable options for your bath? Visit Modern Bathroom to see what we have available, at factory-direct pricing that can save you 70 percent or more!

ADA Compliant Bathroom Design

Intended to regulate the construction and compliance of handicapped accessible bathrooms, the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that all public restrooms in the United States be ADA-compliant. The most prevalent aspect of ADA compliance is measurement and spacing of various bathroom elements, as wheelchairs and other devices can be cumbersome and difficult to maneuver in small spaces. If you’re renovating a bathroom and would like for it to be ADA compliant, here is a list of the most common guidelines that must be followed. For a complete list, please visit the official ADA website or contact the ADA directly.

Grab Bars

An important thing to remember when it comes to grab bars is that they cannot be replaced by towel bars – if you wish to install towel bars and have your bathroom be ADA-compliant, you must also include grab bars in your bathroom. The diameter of the pipe used must be between 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches, and must be installed between 34 and 38 inches off the ground. As a matter of safety and security, the bars must be round in shape and connected directly to posts or walls. This way, someone getting hurt by sharp edges can be prevented.

Sinks & Faucets

Sinks and faucets in an ADA-compliant bathroom shouldn’t be mounted higher than 34 inches from the floor. Additionally, they should have a knee clearance of 27 inches high, 30 inches wide, and 19 inches deep. When purchasing and installing ADA-compliant sinks, be sure to pay attention to the space under the sink: you’ll need a clear floor space and insulated pipes under the sink, so individuals in wheelchairs will be able to use the sink. Faucets should be lever-operated, push, touch, or electronically controlled. Any faucet installed in an ADA-compliant bathroom should be able to be used with one hand without the need to pinch or twist the wrist.

Handicap Toilets

Perhaps the most important part of an ADA-compliant bathroom are handicap toilets. They must have a minimum width of 60 inches, so wheelchairs can easily fit in front of the toilet, and inside and outside the stall. Horizontal grab bars must be installed behind the toilet and on the nearest wall or partition – whichever is closer. When it comes to toilet seats, the height must be between 17” to 19” above the finished floor. The lever for flushing must be placed on the open side of the toiler with the clearest floor space, and mounted no higher than 44” above the floor.

Hand Dryer

Hand dryers are one of the easiest requirements to comply with when it comes to ADA-compliant bathroom design. ADA guidelines require that the provided hand dryers must be either motion activated or touch-free devices. In the past, when push-button activated dryers were popular, these dryers had to be removed in all public areas where you should have handicapped accessible bathrooms. When it comes to bathroom equipment, touch-free is key – those who don’t comply with the touch-free ADA guidelines can be exposed to several fines and other legal repercussions.

If you’re turning an existing bathroom into an ADA-compliant bathroom, Modern Bathroom has an entire line of ADA-compliant vanities, faucets, sinks, and toilets, just to name a few of our ADA-compliant categories. Please visit our website for more ADA-compliant products.

How to Create More Space in Your Bathroom

Despite its functionality and frequency of use, bathrooms are typically the smallest rooms in the home. Combine minimal square footage with limited storage space, and your bathroom can become a haven for junk. If your bathroom is feeling cramped or cluttered, it may be time for a bathroom overhaul. To maximize the space in your bathroom, consider these bathroom design and organizational tips.

Mirror, Mirror, On the Wall...

Does your bathroom have a plate glass mirror that’s been attached to the wall since the 1970s? If so, you should replace it with a smarter solution designed with storage in mind. If your bathroom is lacking a vanity with available shelving, replace your plate glass mirror with a practical medicine cabinet. To create additional storage space, purchase a medicine cabinet that can be recessed into the wall. Once you’ve installed the medicine cabinet in your bathroom, fill it with prescription medication bottles, tubes of tooth paste, and other eyesores that have been cluttering your countertops.

Throw Out the Old

Most homeowners accumulate too many toiletries, towels, bathroom cleaners, and accessories than can realistically fit in their bathroom space. In order to avoid over accumulation, go through your medicine cabinet, vanity drawers, and cabinets every few months and throw out any unused or expired items. From there, assess your bathroom lifestyle needs. Do you need more counter space? Do you need extra storage? Often times, homeowners find that if they throw out old items and forego replacing them until necessary, the storage space already available in their bathroom is more than enough.

Install Under Vanity Lighting

While this design tactic doesn’t actually add more storage space to your bathroom, it’ll make your bathroom look more visually appealing and feel larger than it is. Aside from making your bathroom vanity appear more beautiful, installing under vanity lighting is also functional. Those who install under vanity lighting find that groping for things under the drawers and cabinets becomes a thing of the past. Installing lighting under your vanity isn’t difficult and, in most cases, can be done without the help of a contractor or handyman.

Utilize the Hidden Space

It might be difficult to imagine where you might find an extra inch of space in a small bathroom, but there’s one secret area that’s easy to access and can be used to your advantage. If you have access to a blank wall, the space between the studs offers a lot of potential storage space. Whether you build floating shelves directly between the studs or actually cut into the wall and install built-in bathroom cabinets, you can add a lot of extra space for things like spare toiletries or linens without having to alter the existing layout of your bathroom.

Get Wired

When it comes to charging personal care items in the bathroom the excess cords and wires are not only visually distracting, but they can be dangerous as well. By purchasing cabinets equipped with outlets (or installing your own), you can keep your electric toothbrushes and razors fully charged and completely out of sight, while minimizing the risk of electrical shock. This strategy is especially useful for families or those with young children, as children of toddler age are most susceptible to accidentally shocking themselves in the bathroom.

How to Childproof Your Bathroom

If you have a baby on the way, here’s an important statistic: drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death among children between the ages of 1 and 4, and it only takes a few inches of water to kill a child. Although outdoor pools are the leading threat, bathtubs are the second most common place a child can drown. Although the bathtub is a major danger zone for a child, the potential risks found in a bathroom range from accidental poisoning to electrocution. Below are the primary danger zones, along with childproofing tips for each.

Danger Zone #1: Bathtub

Once your baby outgrows their baby bathtub, they’ll be ready to take baths in a regular tub – but not before you spend some time childproofing. To prevent scalds, adjust the thermostat so your tap water is no warmer than 120°F, and test the bathwater on your wrist before putting your child into the bath. If you live in an apartment and can’t control the water temperature, you can purchase showerheads and faucets with anti-scald technologies. Never leave your child unattended during a bath, for any amount of time. If you need to answer the phone or door, take your baby with you – a drowning can occur in just one or two inches of water, and in a matter of seconds.

Danger Zone #2: Electricity

While curling irons and flat irons should be kept away from children for obvious reasons, common bathroom appliances pose more than a burn risk: they can cause fatal electrocutions. In order to avoid electrocutions, keep all appliances locked away and out of reach when not in use. As with other rooms, all exposed outlets should be covered – especially those located near the bathroom sink or tub. In order to get used to the idea of putting appliances away after use, start doing this as soon as you find out you’re pregnant – that way, putting them away will be second nature by the time your baby is born.

Danger Zone #3: Products & Medication

Did you know a child goes to the emergency room every eight minutes for medicine poisoning? If possible, you should store medications, cleaning products, and sharp bathroom-related items on a high shelf in a linen cabinet, or locked away in a cabinet with a latch. You might think keeping these items in a medicine cabinet or under the sink might do the trick, but young children are naturally curious and will find their way into these areas if there isn’t a lock. Latches designed to keep kids from accessing the contents of a cabinet are a highly effective and affordable way to provide parents with peace of mind.

Danger Zone #4: Toilets

As previously mentioned, babies and young children are curious by nature, and can easily fall into a toilet headfirst. In order to avoid accidental drownings, always keep the toilet lid down and install a toilet lock. Parents should educate all family members who use the bathroom to close the door when not in use, and to re-engage the toilet lock after each use. Additionally, you don’t want your child to use the toilet as a stepping stool to reach the sink, so keep a stool in the bathroom which your child can use to reach the sink when they wash their hands or brush their teeth.

Other Bathroom Childproofing Tips

When childproofing a bathroom, get on your hands and knees so you can view the bathroom from your child’s point of view. If towel bars can be used as handrails by a climbing child, move them to a different area. Check the laundry chute or hamper to make sure your baby can’t get trapped in it, and hide the trashcan behind a locked door. If your bathroom floor gets slippery when wet, purchase a bath mat for inside and outside the tub – just be sure to find ones that dry quickly, as mold and mildew can quickly become an issue.


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