How to Remove a Vanity in Preparation of a Remodel

Remodeling a room in your home can be a challenging and complicated process. Usually, you’ll have to perform a significant amount of demolition before you can rebuild, and it’s important to know how to do this effectively so you won’t cause any unwanted damage. In regards to the bathroom, one of the most puzzling parts of the remolding process is how to remove a vanity. Typically, a bathroom vanity is sealed and secured to the actual structure of the bathroom, including the plumbing, which can make removal especially tricky. With these basic tips, you’ll be on the right track towards properly removing your vanity.

Water Supply

First and foremost, you’ll need to shut off the water supply before you can remove the vanity. In order to do this, you’ll need to reach underneath the sink and turn the hot and cold-water shut-off valves. Next, you’ll want to disconnect the water supply lines by using a wrench to remove the nut that holds the water supply line to the shutoff valve. This process can get somewhat messy, so it’ll help to have a bucket close by. Finally, you’re going to need to disconnect the waste drain. This can be done either by hand or by using a wrench or pliers, depending on the material of the waste drain, which will typically be either PVC pipe or chrome.

Remove From Wall

Now that you’ve taken care of the water supply, it’s time to remove the vanity from the wall. In some cases, you’ll need to start with the mirror. If the mirror rests on the vanity counter top, then removing the mirror first will be necessary, as it can crack when the vanity is removed from the wall. Once this has been addressed, you’ll want to detach the vanity counter top and cabinet by using a utility knife to cut through the caulk joint adhesive that holds the vanity to the wall. It’s important to be both cautious and patient during this process, as you’ll want to avoid cutting into the drywall. The goal here is to carefully undo the attachment between the vanity itself and the wall of your bathroom, as well as between the vanity top and cabinet.

Take Apart

At this point, all that’s left is the removal of the main components of the vanity from the room. First, you’ll remove the vanity top from the sink base. Usually, this will be a fairly easy process and the top will be removed smoothly with the adhesive cut. However, in some cases, the vanity top will be attached to the bottom by clips, which you’ll need to loosen before removal. Once the vanity top has been disconnected from the base, it’s time to remove the sink base cabinet. Check to see where the cabinet is attached to the wall, which is generally done with screws or nails, and carefully remove them. Once you’ve done this, you should be able to remove the sink base cabinet from the wall with ease.

Once you’ve hauled out the vanity top and bottom pieces, just plug up the drain pipes, scrape off any excess caulk, and you’ll be all set. With these tips, you can be well on your way to properly removing your bathroom vanity in time to begin your remodeling process. Good luck!

How to Turn Vintage Furniture into a Bathroom Vanity

From minor improvements to complete overhauls, kitchens and bathrooms typically see the most renovation work over the course of a lifetime. While some improvement projects require the expertise of a contractor and qualified workers, some are easy enough for almost anyone to complete. Although repurposing vintage furniture into a stylish and chic bathroom vanity isn’t an entirely new concept, the notions of upcycling and repurposing have grown more popular in recent years. If you’re considering bringing some unique, vintage style into your bathroom, read on for some repurposing tips.

Pay Attention to Height

The “new rule” for standard bathroom vanities is that the countertop should be 34-36” from the floor. In older homes, you may notice shorter vanities – the older standard was 32-34” off the ground, likely because the present population is taller in comparison. Since it’s difficult to find a vintage piece at the standard bathroom vanity height, the rules change when repurposing vintage furniture into a vanity. Instead of bringing a tape measurer with you while shopping, keep these questions in mind: can you comfortably brush your teeth while standing in front of this piece? If you hang a mirror above the piece will you be able to see your whole face? As long as the height is comfortable and practical for you and the rest of your family, go for it. If you’re set on keeping your vanity at its standard height, consider mounting the vanity to the wall to make up the difference.

Counter Material

The truth is, repurposing vintage furniture for use in other rooms of the home is much easier than the bathroom, where moisture and steam are daily occurrences. In some cases, you may be forced to choose a new top surface in order to escape the accumulation of mold or gradual deterioration of the piece over time. Hardwood surfaces can be used in a bathroom, but only if they’ve been waxed or oiled over the years and are intended for use in a bathroom that gets low-to-regular use. However, if the existing surface is delicate, already in need of repair, or will be used in a public, family, or children’s bathroom, you should consider exchanging the top surface for something with a bit more durability. Marble and quartz are durable choices that are an aesthetic match with most vintage furniture.

Adapting to Modern Plumbing

Unfortunately, not all pieces of antique furniture are suitable for a conversion to plumbing. If you’ve decided that the vintage piece can be adapted to modern plumbing, you’ll need to carefully plan out the process. You’ll need to accommodate the sink and its plumbing for a proper fit, spend time waterproofing the piece both inside and out, or you may have to replace older wood tops with granite or other natural stone slabs. If you love the look of vintage furniture but aren’t sure you have the wherewithal to adapt the piece of furniture on your own, you can either call in the professionals or find a line of reproduction pieces – they’ll be designed for modern plumbing without losing their vintage look and feel.

Finish with Style

Since the DIY vintage vanity is almost guaranteed to be the focal point of your bathroom, it’s important to keep everything else in your bathroom as minimalistic as possible – otherwise your guests may feel bombarded with things to look at whenever they need to wash their hands. Your hardware choice should complement the look of your antique vanity. In many cases, brushed nickel or distressed bronze faucets are great choices, while polished and shiny faucets may distract from the overall vintage look of your bathroom. For countertop accessories, such as soap dishes or toothbrush holders, head to your local antique shops. Even if you don’t find what you’re looking for in an antique shop, you may be inspired to repurpose another antique piece into something new.

Give Your Bathroom a New Look with a New Vanity

If you only have the budget to make one upgrade to your bathroom décor, choose a new bathroom vanity. Yes, you can install a new fancy toilet or an ultra-chic waterfall shower, but nothing will make your bathroom look fresher than a brand new vanity. Not only are they the focal point of virtually every bathroom, but installing a new vanity is a quick and easy way to give your bathroom an entirely new look. Since not everyone has the luxury of a large bathroom and an even larger budget, finding a vanity that fits your space is key. Here are some tips for choosing the perfect vanity for your space, style, and budget.

Why a Vanity?

While the installation of a new shower or toilet tends to require plumbing experience that just adds to the overall cost, bathroom vanities can be switched out and replaced with relative ease. If you’re somewhat comfortable using basic household tools, chances are you can replace a vanity on your own – without the help of expensive contractors or remodelers. With just a little carpentry experience and a passion for DIY, you can have a new, stylish vanity installed in no time. Before you worry about style or color, start by considering the bathroom space you have available.

Choose a Size

If you have a large bathroom, this step is simple. Since you won’t have as many space limitations, you’ll have a lot of freedom and can easily go for that extra-wide bath vanity with oversized mirrors. If you have a smaller bathroom, you may be more limited with your choices, but this doesn’t mean your bathroom has to suffer. A classic trick for making a small bathroom appear larger is to install a pedestal sink with a simple hanging mirror. Pedestal style sinks work well in smaller bathrooms, as they create the illusion of space without sacrificing valuable square footage. If you need extra storage space, hang decorative fabric around the edge of the sink and discreetly store bathroom items below.

Select a Theme

The important thing about updating the look of your bathroom with a new vanity is to select an overall theme. Since vanities are the focal point of bathrooms, it’s important to explore all your design options before making a final decision. If you’re interested in a more modern flair, art deco or black, lacquered wood are good choices. For those interested in more classic approach, traditional bath vanities come in all shapes and sizes, ranging from farmhouse to shabby chic. Fortunately, many retail stores and websites allow you to preview hundreds of different designs before making a final decision.

Pay Attention to Countertops

As with kitchen countertops, those installed in bathrooms should be constructed of a nonporous material. Over time, moisture can ruin otherwise good-looking countertops made of laminate, natural wood, or other materials. While the majority of bathroom vanities are made of nonporous material, it never hurts to verify – especially if you’re repurposing another piece of furniture as a bathroom vanity. Generally, people choose a bathroom vanity that complements their home. If you’re leaning towards an upgrade in the future, some find it beneficial to upgrade in phases – that way you can mix and match styles until you figure out what makes you comfortable. With a bit of time and patience, you’ll have a beautiful bathroom before you know it.

How to Remove Paint Splatters From a Vanity

Removing paint splatters and spots is a common problem, even if you’ve used plastic tarp, painter’s tape, and other protective measures while painting. The real challenge isn’t in removing the paint spills, but it’s in doing so without removing the finish of your vanity. One of a number of solvents might work, and it’s a good idea to start with the mildest one before working your way to stronger solvents that can more easily cause damage. If you’ve tried scraping off the excess paint to no avail, here’s some tips for removing paint splatters from your vanity.

What You’ll Need

When it comes to removing paint splatters from a vanity, it’s a relatively easy task with only a few necessary "ingredients". Here’s what you’ll need before you can start:

  • Mild soap
  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Water
  • Nail polish remover
  • Paint stripper
  • Soft cloths
  • Cotton balls

The best time to remove paint splatters and spills is when they’re fresh. If you’ve waited too long and a skin has developed, you’ll probably find that the paint is too difficult to remove by wiping it with a cloth. If this is the case, follow these steps to remove paint.

Steps to Remove the Paint

The amount of effort needed to remove the paint relies heavily on how long it’s been there and the condition of the vanity surface. Start by cleaning the surface and paint splotches with a mild soap or bathroom cleaner. From there, scrub the entire surface gently with a soft cloth. If the paint is fresh, this may be all that’s needed to remove the splatters. If the paint has already dried completely, it will be more difficult to remove. If this is the case:

  1. Moisten a cotton ball with nail polish remover.
  2. Rub it over the entire surface.
  3. As soon as the paint is removed, clean the surface with cleaner and water to remove any residue from the nail polish remover. (Note: if the nail polish remover is left on the surface of your vanity for too long, it can cause irreversible damage, so clean it off as soon as possible.)
  4. If the paint splatters remain, it may be necessary to use a paint stripper to remove it. Apply it very carefully, and spot check to avoid any damage.
  5. Once the paint is removed, clean the surface as usual.

Other Tips and Advice

To avoid unnecessary damage, always start with the least invasive removal method possible. From there, gradually work your way up to the paint stripper. Additionally, it’s best to spot test a hidden area of the vanity to ensure the products you’re using won’t discolor or change the finish and surface of your vanity. Finally, the longer you wait to remove the paint the more difficult it will be to get rid of. If possible, clean as you go – it’ll save you time and effort down the line.

How to Paint a Bathroom Vanity like a Professional

Over the past few decades, contractors and home builders have consistently installed oak vanities in new bathrooms. While there’s nothing wrong with wood vanities, the humidity of a bathroom can begin to make them look washed out over time. Whether you’re an expert DIYer or are new to the game, repainting your bathroom vanity is a fun and easy weekend project. As with any other paint job, it requires some preparation and lots of patience; follow these steps and you’ll be well on your way to a shiny "new" bathroom vanity.

Materials & Preparation

As with any other DIY project, collecting your materials beforehand is essential. Materials can vary depending on the condition of your vanity, but here’s a list of the basics: a high density foam roller, household cleaner, alcohol, primer, sandpaper, foam brush, acrylic latex-based paint, painter’s tape, and plastic sheeting. You’ll likely create a mess during the project, so it’s best to protect your walls and floor with the plastic sheeting. From there, remove the vanity drawers and doors, and remove all hardware. Wash the doors and vanity with a solution of two ounces of household cleaner per gallon of water. After the doors and vanity have dried, rub down the surfaces with alcohol. This will remove any residual gunk and prepare your vanity for a fresh coat of paint.

Prime & Paint

Acrylic latex-based paint, whether sprayed or brushed, needs an undercoat of a compatible primer to ensure proper adhesion. Use 150-grit sandpaper to sand the exposed surfaces, scraping loose any peeling paint. Once you’ve finished sanding, use a vacuum or tack cloth to wipe away the excess dust. Before you actually begin painting, apply two coats of primer to the drawers, doors, and vanity. Once dry, it’s time to paint. A high quality acrylic latex-based paint will work fine, or you can buy a paint that’s formulated specifically for cabinets. Typically, you’ll need at least two coats of paint to eliminate any burn through and/or eliminate the wood look.

Replace Hardware & Reassemble

If you want to give your vanity a totally new look, consider changing the drawer knobs and door handles. While your drawers and doors are separated from the vanity, fill the existing holes with wood filler and allow them to dry. Once dry, mount the new pulls and handles for a brand new look. Once the new hardware has been installed or the old hardware has been replaced, it’s time to reassemble the vanity. Start with the bottom drawers and work your way up, making sure to fix any broken drawers or cracks along the way. Be patient – it can take a day or two for the paint to dry completely, and the last thing you want is to have to paint a scratched or damaged vanity all over again.

Other Tips

If you don’t have a window in your bathroom, wear a dust mask while sanding and painting to avoid breathing in dust or fumes. Be sure to follow the recommended drying requirements for the primer and paint, otherwise the final result may not turn out as desired. Some stores carry a specialty paint designed for cabinets – this paint can be used on vanities and does not require a primer. Regardless of your DIY skill level, repainting a bathroom vanity is a relatively easy home renovation task – you’ll save time (and money) by not having to hire a pro!

How to Decorate a Small Bathroom Vanity

More than just a place to wash up, bathroom sinks and vanities are a part of your bathroom you can decorate in your own style. From antique cabinets to modern designs, there are countless style options when it comes to the vanity itself – but why not expand your creative touch beyond the vanity design? If you’re concerned about decorating your bathroom vanity due to its small size, you can still pack a powerful decorating punch with the right accents and fixtures. Here are some tips for organizing, decorating, and keeping your small bathroom vanity a clutter-free and fully-functional extension of yourself.

Focus on the Essentials First

When it comes to decorating your small bathroom vanity, it’s important to pay attention to the essentials. Put your daily supplies out first, such as soap holders, toothbrushes, and cups. From there, examine how much space is left over. If there’s sufficient room, you can add a picture frame or a small vase of flowers. If the vanity looks cluttered with the essentials, adding more clutter to the countertops will only decrease the functionality of your bathroom vanity. Fortunately, there are ways to decorate small bathroom vanities without adding knick-knacks and accessories to the already crowded countertops.

Consider Small Accent Pieces

If you’d like to keep your countertops as clutter-free as possible, consider using small accent pieces as decoration. Switching up the knobs on your vanity is a great place to start. If you have an antique vanity, head to your local antique store for a selection of beautiful vintage knobs. Those with modern vanities can easily find glass, quartz, glass, silver, or metal bathroom vanity knobs online. Not only is decorating with small accent pieces an easy way to add personality to your bathroom, but it’s perfect for those on a budget: you can easily find vanity knobs for as low as $3 both in stores and online.

Backsplashes, Walls, and Panels

One of the easiest ways to decorate a small bathroom vanity without sacrificing space is to focus on the backsplash, walls, and panels surrounding the fixture. From pegboards and pennies to old maps and even chalkboard paint, a creative and fun backsplash is guaranteed to be a conversation-starter among family and friends. For creative inspiration, read our article about innovative and inexpensive backsplash ideas. When it comes to walls and panels, consider painting them in a fun or funky color – just be sure it doesn’t clash with your vanity or the rest of your bathroom décor.

Fresh Flowers and Natural Light

If you’re fortunate enough to have the luxury of a bathroom window, take advantage of the light it produces. While bathroom lighting fixtures are great solution for bathrooms that are low on light, nothing quite compares to the beauty of natural light and the convenience of fresh air. During the spring and summer months, consider keeping a small vase of daisies, roses, or lilies on the countertop of your bathroom vanity. During the fall and winter months, create your own seasonal displays with leaves, twigs, branches, bark, sprigs of holly, or a bit of evergreen straight off the Christmas tree.

Modern Bathroom’s Bathroom Vanity Buying Guide

While it might not be the most exciting part of a bathroom remodel, choosing the right bathroom vanity can complete (or completely ruin) your bathroom design. If it’s placed awkwardly in a high traffic zone or doesn’t match with other décor, the rest of your bathroom will suffer the consequences. Since they’re an essential part of a bathroom renovation, they can dictate the overall look and feel of your bathroom. Whether you’re going traditional or modern, our bathroom vanity buying guide can help you select the very best vanity for your home.

Do You Have Room?

Before shopping for a bathroom vanity, scope out how much room you actually have in your bathroom. If you’ve always wanted a double vanity but realize you don’t have the space, this could save you the headache and financial hassle of having to purchase and return an oversized vanity. While double vanities offer more storage and the convenience of more than one person being able to get ready at the same time, the truth is, not many people actually have the space. Once you measure your space and decide how much room you can dedicate to a vanity, it’s time to decide on a style.

Will it Match Your Design Plan?

At the end of the day, your bathroom vanity will have to match the design of the rest of your bathroom. If you’re going for a traditional look and feel, you should browse wood or antique bathroom vanities, as their soft tones and warm colors will perfectly fit in with the rest of the room. If you’d like to take a more modern approach, a modern bath vanity in a dark color or with a sleek glass sink may be your best choice. Regardless of the bath vanity you choose, it’s important that it matches with your sink, faucets, and other bathroom fixtures – so pay attention to your bathroom in its entirety.

Pay Attention to Plumbing

If you’re like most, chances are you’re remodeling on a budget. If you need to change your bathroom’s plumbing in order to install your new vanity, it’s going to take a huge chunk out of your budget. Even switching from a traditional floor-mounted vanity to a wall-mounted version could mean you’ll have to reroute pipes and drains. While locating a vanity far from other bath fixtures might look great, it’ll require a higher cost for rough plumbing. If you’d like to make your bathroom remodel as cost-efficient as possible, experts recommend replacing your bath vanity with one that’s almost identical.

Choose an Appropriate Countertop

While you may not have a choice depending on the type of vanity you choose, some vanity retailers allow you to choose your own countertop. Choosing a good surface for your vanity top is crucial, as it needs to hold up to the rigors of your particular situation. For example, a decorative vanity in a powder room doesn’t require the same amount of durability or resistance as a vanity in the family bathroom. Also, be sure to keep an eye on the types of cleaners you use in your bathroom – certain cleaners could permanently damage the countertops of your vanity.

How to Refinish Wood Vanities

Wood vanities are a great way to add warmth and charm to any style bathroom, but changes in humidity, age, and normal wear and tear can take a toll on even the most maintained wood vanity. Fortunately, you don’t have to rip out your old wood vanities and replace them with new ones – refinishing a bathroom vanity is a relatively simple DIY project. Giving your vanity a new coat of stain or a fresh coat of paint can transform its look, add years to its life, and save you money.

Preparation

Before you get started, make sure you have all the items you’ll need to refinish your wood vanity. Since the project is relatively simple, you probably have most of these items available in your toolshed. If you don’t already own them, they can be purchased or rented from a local home improvement store.

  • Cleaning product
  • Sponge/soft cloths
  • Screwdriver
  • Painter’s tape
  • Sandpaper
  • Hand sander
  • Shop vacuum
  • Stain or primer and paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Polyurethane finish

Once you have all the items, go over the bathroom vanity with a cleaning product to remove all signs of hairspray, makeup, soap scum, deodorant, and other products that may have accumulated over time. Next, remove the drawers, handles, and knobs from your vanity. Place the handles and knobs in a plastic bag so you can easily put them back on once you’re finished.

Strip the Paint

Place the doors and drawers on drop cloths on a flat surface. Make sure the area you’re working in is well-ventilated, as some strippers, stains, and paints have strong fumes. Apply a chemical stripper to the doors and drawers with a paintbrush; once the stripper has been left standing for the recommended amount of time, scrape away the old finish. Wipe down the wood with a clean cloth. Use the hand sander and 180-grit sandpaper to remove any traces of the old finish. Be sure to work with the grain of the wood, and avoid applying too much pressure.

Before stripping and sanding the rest of the vanity, place painter’s tape on the wall around the vanity – this will prevent any paint from getting on the surrounding walls.

Prime, Paint, Stain

Once the paint has been stripped, it’s time to prime, paint, or stain the wood. Before getting started, use the shop vacuum to remove any excess dust from the vanity. If primer isn’t included in your paint, you’ll have to prime the wood before painting – it’ll help the top coat adhere to the wood and will help the paint last longer. Let the primer dry completely, which can take anywhere from one to ten hours. Read the manufacturer’s instructions for recommended drying times. Once the primer is dry, apply either the stain or paint. Once the paint is dry, apply a polyurethane finish designed for the bathroom. Let the polyurethane dry completely before reattaching the cabinets, drawers, and hardware.

How to Choose the Right Bathroom Vanity

While it’s not necessarily the most glamorous part of a bathroom remodel, choosing the right bathroom vanity can make or break your bathroom design. If your vanity is placed in an awkward position, uses mismatched materials, or doesn’t have enough storage space, the rest of your bathroom will suffer. While a beautiful bathroom ensures you’re happy with your surroundings, functionality is just as important as aesthetics. Here’s some professional tips for choosing your bathroom cornerstone:

Size

When it comes to any type of remodel, working within your home’s established architecture is part of the equation. By evaluating your lifestyle, size of the bathroom, and the demands that will be placed on the vanity, the preferred size will become evident rather quickly. While your storage needs do impact the size of your vanity, taking the size of your bathroom into consideration is more important. While 32 inches is the go-to height for bathroom vanities, many modern designers recommend purchasing a vanity that’s between 34 and 35 inches. Ultimately, you should choose a vanity that will offer comfort and convenience to those who will use it, regardless of the size recommended by designers.

Placement

As far as placement goes, access and plumbing are the two areas of primary concern: your vanity shouldn’t disrupt the flow of traffic, and it should be placed near current plumbing. Additionally, homeowners should think about cleaning and vanity door swing space – if the surrounding areas aren’t accessible for cleaning and the cabinet doors would get in the way of foot traffic, another vanity design should be considered. While changing your bathroom’s plumbing in order to install a new vanity is a possibility, it’s going to account for a large chunk of your budget and, in most cases, is not ideal.

Materials

Since vanities are placed in hot and humid environments, it’s important that your vanity can withstand environmental stress. With that in mind, wood veneers, laminates and thermofoil tend to work well in bathrooms. Although hardwood is an attractive choice, hardwood vanities should be properly sealed and lacquered to prevent damage from wear and tear over time. Although lacquer can protect wood, it doesn’t make it indestructible. If a clear finish or lacquer is used, water will still affect the wood if it’s left standing on it. These types of vanities are recommended for use in guest bathrooms or bathrooms that aren’t used on a consistent basis.

Do Your Research

Although this applies to any form of decorating and remodeling, it’s worth noting once again: be sure to explore your options before finalizing a purchase. Keep an eye out for seasonal sales, such as Modern Bathroom’s Labor Day Sale, and remember that price doesn’t always translate to taste. If you can’t afford a designer edition of a bathroom vanity, look for an imitation in a local warehouse. Choosing the perfect bathroom vanity can make or break the look and feel of your bathroom, so take your time, be creative, do your research, and work with the space you have.

Pedestal Sink or Vanity: The Great Debate

Although bathroom sinks come in a variety of styles, colors and materials, deciding between a pedestal sink and vanity is a classic debate. While many homeowners can easily decide on a sink color and style, choosing between a pedestal sink and vanity tends to be one of the hardest decisions. Some interior designers claim you can’t go wrong with either, but there are things you should take into consideration before deciding which style is right for your home. While pedestal sinks and vanities do the same job at the end of the day, they have several major differences that might make one a better fit for your home.

Space

A design rule of thumb states that the more floor space that’s visible, the more open a room will feel. If your bathroom feels cramped and small, a pedestal sink is the best choice for you since the open base of a pedestal sink can help even the smallest areas feel more spacious. Vanities, especially vanities with two sinks, tend to be significantly larger than pedestal sinks. While they can be the perfect addition to any bathroom, some bathrooms are simply too small for bathroom vanities. Note: if you’re replacing an existing vanity with a pedestal sink, the floor might need to be worked on, depending on what’s underneath the existing vanity.

Storage

Since vanities are larger than pedestal sinks, they also offer significantly more storage space - especially if your vanity comes with a long storage cabinet under the sinks. These cabinets tend to span the length and width of the vanity, and are a great place to store cleaning supplies, toiletries, and extra bath linens. If your bathroom is low on space but you need extra storage, you can offset the lack of storage under the sink elsewhere in the bath, including over-the-toilet shelves, open shelving with baskets, medicine cabinets, or a set of drawers. If storage and floor space are equally important, consider a wall-mounted vanity or console sink - something that can offer more storage while freeing up valuable floor space.

Maintenance

Pedestal sinks are easier to clean, due to their size and simple design. Since vanities have more features, including drawers and cabinets, dust and grime are more likely to accumulate. Additionally, the countertop of a vanity adds time to your regular cleaning schedule. Depending on the type of material chosen for the vanity, staining could be an issue as well. For example, marble and granite must be sealed to prevent staining and water absorption. While pedestal sinks are easier to clean than vanities, both are typically easy to clean and only require mild soap and water.

Installation

While most homeowners can install a vanity without too much difficulty, pedestal sinks tend to be a bit harder to install. Since pedestal sinks have no cabinet area to hide plumbing lines, unsightly holes, and water supply lines, everything must be installed so the connections are obscured. In order to do this, the drain must be centered perfectly and the supply lines must be installed at the correct height and close to the center of the faucet valves. For those on the inexperienced side, this can prove to be difficult. For these reasons, it’s usually recommended that plumbers install pedestal sinks.