How to Organize Your Medicine Cabinet

When organizing your bathroom, it’s normal to prioritize the items that you and your guests will see each time they enter. However, what can often get out of hand are the areas that people don’t always see, such as drawers and cabinets. It can be frustrating and overwhelming to sort through a cluttered and disorganized medicine cabinet that is full of outdated and obsolete items, so this post will provide you with a few basic tips to restore your medicine cabinet to its most organized, functional, and presentable state.

Start with a Clean Slate

Before you start organizing your medicine cabinet, it’s best to take everything out and get rid of any items for which you have no use. This involves checking the expiration dates on all of your medications and tossing the expired ones. You should also take a look at some products that may be past their prime, such as old Band-Aids or dried out face wipes. Your medicine cabinet will be much more manageable and easy to navigate if you can reduce its contents to the items that you will actually use. While you’re at it, this would be a good time to clean the cabinet itself. Use the temporarily empty cabinet as an opportunity to do some dusting and to wipe down the shelves, so when you place the items back in the cabinet they will be stored in a clean area.

Decide What Belongs

Another good way to reduce clutter in your medicine cabinet is to evaluate which items you’ll need easy access to. For example, you’ll want your toothbrush and other dental care products to be readily available, along with other daily hygiene medications and frequently used medications. If you wear contacts, then go ahead and place your lens case and contact solution within easy reach. However, your medicine cabinet can quickly become overcrowded if you use it to store items you only use every few months. For these products, it’s best to find a separate storage solution, such as drawers or a separate storage cabinet. This way, you’ll still have access to these items, but they won’t be taking away from the limited space in your medicine cabinet.

Organize

Now that you’ve reduced the contents of your medicine cabinet, you can begin to establish an organized system. For example, you can reserve the top shelf for first-aid supplies, such as Band-Aids and disinfectants. In this same section, you can place items such as tweezers and nail clippers, since these do not take up too much space and will be used with similar frequency. You can designate the next shelf for your daily use items, such as your toothbrush, toothpaste, contact supplies, and deodorant. Finally, you can use the rest of the space for beauty products. Create an area for your makeup, hair products, face wash, and similar products. The key is to group similar items together, which will make it easier to keep your cabinet organized over a long period of time.

Add Accessories

Now that you’ve created a more organized system in your medicine cabinet, you can choose to add some extra pieces to help out with storing certain items. For instance, you can get a small toothbrush holder in case you have multiple toothbrushes in your cabinet, which will help keep them clean and separated. You can make use of small jars for items such as Q-tips or gauze pads. This last part is optional, but it might just provide the finishing touches on a neatly organized medicine cabinet.

While it is understandable to prioritize with organizing the more commonly seen parts of your bathroom, you don’t want to let your medicine cabinet get out of hand. A disorganized medicine cabinet can be a nightmare, both for you, and on occasion, your guests. Often times when this area becomes cluttered and disorganized, it can be difficult to decide where to begin, but with these basic tips, you can be well on your way to creating a neat, clean, and organized medicine cabinet in your bathroom.

How to Turn Vintage Furniture into a Bathroom Vanity

From minor improvements to complete overhauls, kitchens and bathrooms typically see the most renovation work over the course of a lifetime. While some improvement projects require the expertise of a contractor and qualified workers, some are easy enough for almost anyone to complete. Although repurposing vintage furniture into a stylish and chic bathroom vanity isn’t an entirely new concept, the notions of upcycling and repurposing have grown more popular in recent years. If you’re considering bringing some unique, vintage style into your bathroom, read on for some repurposing tips.

Pay Attention to Height

The “new rule” for standard bathroom vanities is that the countertop should be 34-36” from the floor. In older homes, you may notice shorter vanities – the older standard was 32-34” off the ground, likely because the present population is taller in comparison. Since it’s difficult to find a vintage piece at the standard bathroom vanity height, the rules change when repurposing vintage furniture into a vanity. Instead of bringing a tape measurer with you while shopping, keep these questions in mind: can you comfortably brush your teeth while standing in front of this piece? If you hang a mirror above the piece will you be able to see your whole face? As long as the height is comfortable and practical for you and the rest of your family, go for it. If you’re set on keeping your vanity at its standard height, consider mounting the vanity to the wall to make up the difference.

Counter Material

The truth is, repurposing vintage furniture for use in other rooms of the home is much easier than the bathroom, where moisture and steam are daily occurrences. In some cases, you may be forced to choose a new top surface in order to escape the accumulation of mold or gradual deterioration of the piece over time. Hardwood surfaces can be used in a bathroom, but only if they’ve been waxed or oiled over the years and are intended for use in a bathroom that gets low-to-regular use. However, if the existing surface is delicate, already in need of repair, or will be used in a public, family, or children’s bathroom, you should consider exchanging the top surface for something with a bit more durability. Marble and quartz are durable choices that are an aesthetic match with most vintage furniture.

Adapting to Modern Plumbing

Unfortunately, not all pieces of antique furniture are suitable for a conversion to plumbing. If you’ve decided that the vintage piece can be adapted to modern plumbing, you’ll need to carefully plan out the process. You’ll need to accommodate the sink and its plumbing for a proper fit, spend time waterproofing the piece both inside and out, or you may have to replace older wood tops with granite or other natural stone slabs. If you love the look of vintage furniture but aren’t sure you have the wherewithal to adapt the piece of furniture on your own, you can either call in the professionals or find a line of reproduction pieces – they’ll be designed for modern plumbing without losing their vintage look and feel.

Finish with Style

Since the DIY vintage vanity is almost guaranteed to be the focal point of your bathroom, it’s important to keep everything else in your bathroom as minimalistic as possible – otherwise your guests may feel bombarded with things to look at whenever they need to wash their hands. Your hardware choice should complement the look of your antique vanity. In many cases, brushed nickel or distressed bronze faucets are great choices, while polished and shiny faucets may distract from the overall vintage look of your bathroom. For countertop accessories, such as soap dishes or toothbrush holders, head to your local antique shops. Even if you don’t find what you’re looking for in an antique shop, you may be inspired to repurpose another antique piece into something new.

How to Match Your Bathroom to Your Personality

Since the bathroom is one of the few places where you can relax without interruption, it’s important that it reflects your personality and unique style. Studies show that if you’re comfortable with your surroundings, you’ll be happier and healthier while spending time in your home. By decorating your bathroom according to your personality, you’ll feel at ease while taking a bath or energized while getting ready in the morning. With all the wall color, vanity, and tub options available on the market, why not match your bathroom to your personality? If you’re curious about how, here’s our guide for bringing your personality into your bathroom.

Start with Color

Adding color to your bathroom is perhaps the easiest way to breathe some life into your bathroom. Whether you like to relax in your sunken tub after a long day at the office or prefer an energized space when getting ready in the morning, there’s a color for that. While white is a popular choice for minimalists, bright bathrooms are all the rage. In fact, some of the most beautiful bathrooms pair striking accents with muted backdrop: purple against white, sea foam green against grey, or a vivid yellow against natural wood. If you prefer a more neutral bathroom, consider keeping things light – light brown, light greys, or light tans. Darker tones, such as deep reds and browns, are perfect for those interested in bringing feelings of warmth and comfort into their bathroom.

Choose a Vanity

Before choosing a vanity style or color, it’s important to decide on a type. If you have the extra square footage, most experts recommend purchasing a double vanity – potential homebuyers will see it as a perk, and you’ll enjoy the extra counter space in the meantime. If you consider yourself to be light-hearted and easygoing, a vanity made of teak wood may be the perfect choice for you. Since teak contains hints of yellow and tends to reflect light better than other types of vanities, a calming or soothing effect will take over your bathroom. If you’re more of an introvert, a vanity made of mahogany wood will bring class and formality into your bathroom.

Faucets and Door Handles

It may sound silly, but different faucet finishes can evoke various styles and personalities. If you consider yourself to be traditional or classy, easy-going finishes such as polished silver or white porcelain are a great way to bring a bit of sophistication into your bathroom. If your friends would describe you as being adventurous or daring, head to your local antique store – you’re sure to find a great selection of antique and vintage door handles and cabinet knobs. And, if you’re feeling especially crafty, you can make your own cabinet knobs using just about anything, including wine corks, broken jewelry, pebbles from the garden, bent spoons, and rulers.

Do-It-Yourself

One of the best ways to match your bathroom to your personality is to create a one-of-a-kind DIY piece. If you love to travel, create a collage using old map books – just be sure to frame the piece in a humidity-resistant frame. Since bathrooms are one of the most humid rooms, special care needs to be taken when choosing artwork to display. For more information, click here. Other fun projects can include using an old ladder as a display area for plants, making your own homemade soap in unique designs and colors, or painting your doors with chalkboard paint and writing inspirational quotes or music lyrics on the inside or outside of your bathroom door. When it comes to these projects, don’t be shy – your bathroom can never have too much personality.

ADA Compliant Bathroom Design

Intended to regulate the construction and compliance of handicapped accessible bathrooms, the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that all public restrooms in the United States be ADA-compliant. The most prevalent aspect of ADA compliance is measurement and spacing of various bathroom elements, as wheelchairs and other devices can be cumbersome and difficult to maneuver in small spaces. If you’re renovating a bathroom and would like for it to be ADA compliant, here is a list of the most common guidelines that must be followed. For a complete list, please visit the official ADA website or contact the ADA directly.

Grab Bars

An important thing to remember when it comes to grab bars is that they cannot be replaced by towel bars – if you wish to install towel bars and have your bathroom be ADA-compliant, you must also include grab bars in your bathroom. The diameter of the pipe used must be between 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches, and must be installed between 34 and 38 inches off the ground. As a matter of safety and security, the bars must be round in shape and connected directly to posts or walls. This way, someone getting hurt by sharp edges can be prevented.

Sinks & Faucets

Sinks and faucets in an ADA-compliant bathroom shouldn’t be mounted higher than 34 inches from the floor. Additionally, they should have a knee clearance of 27 inches high, 30 inches wide, and 19 inches deep. When purchasing and installing ADA-compliant sinks, be sure to pay attention to the space under the sink: you’ll need a clear floor space and insulated pipes under the sink, so individuals in wheelchairs will be able to use the sink. Faucets should be lever-operated, push, touch, or electronically controlled. Any faucet installed in an ADA-compliant bathroom should be able to be used with one hand without the need to pinch or twist the wrist.

Handicap Toilets

Perhaps the most important part of an ADA-compliant bathroom are handicap toilets. They must have a minimum width of 60 inches, so wheelchairs can easily fit in front of the toilet, and inside and outside the stall. Horizontal grab bars must be installed behind the toilet and on the nearest wall or partition – whichever is closer. When it comes to toilet seats, the height must be between 17” to 19” above the finished floor. The lever for flushing must be placed on the open side of the toiler with the clearest floor space, and mounted no higher than 44” above the floor.

Hand Dryer

Hand dryers are one of the easiest requirements to comply with when it comes to ADA-compliant bathroom design. ADA guidelines require that the provided hand dryers must be either motion activated or touch-free devices. In the past, when push-button activated dryers were popular, these dryers had to be removed in all public areas where you should have handicapped accessible bathrooms. When it comes to bathroom equipment, touch-free is key – those who don’t comply with the touch-free ADA guidelines can be exposed to several fines and other legal repercussions.

If you’re turning an existing bathroom into an ADA-compliant bathroom, Modern Bathroom has an entire line of ADA-compliant vanities, faucets, sinks, and toilets, just to name a few of our ADA-compliant categories. Please visit our website for more ADA-compliant products.

What Type of Shower Base is Right for You?

If you’re midway through a bathroom remodel, you maybe browsing the Web for shower bases. When it comes to shower bases, there are many different types – each with their own unique pros and cons. Some of them are easy enough for an amateur to install, while others should be left to the professionals. From pre-cast to acrylic shower bases, here’s what you need to know in order to choose the right shower base for your bathroom.

Pre-cast Shower Base

This type of shower base comes in various shapes and sizes, and is ready to install right out of the box. Neo angle bases are designed for corner showers, and come with a curb, tile flanges, and a built-in drain pocket. Easy enough for even the most novice DIYer to install, most manufacturers will make custom pre-cast bases that are sure to fit almost any size, shape, and drain location. Note: before you begin installation, read and review the manufacturer’s installation instructions and tips. The entire success of your project depends on a good installation of the base – don’t install them out of level or you’ll be reprimanding yourself later on down the line.

Custom Tile Shower Base

While a custom tile shower base can be built from scratch or built from a kit, it’s time consuming and can be tedious. If you wouldn’t consider yourself a handy person and don’t have a ton of patience, choose the pre-cast base, as custom tile shower bases aren’t the easiest to put together. Made by framing the outline of the shower base with standard 2 X 4 construction, many municipalities will require an inspection before you can install a custom tile shower base. The pros include the freedom to make the shower base any size you’d like, while the cons include having to seal and clean the grout often so as to avoid leaks and mold.

Acrylic Shower Base

Made by thermos-forming acrylic over a fiberglass substrate, acrylic is an extremely lightweight shower base option. Not only is it light and easy to install, but it comes in a variety of sizes and colors. If your old shower base was especially scratched, an acrylic shower base may be the right choice – the color goes a long way through the material so, if you do scratch the surface, it won’t be a different color than the rest of the base. A con to keep in mind: most household cleaners are especially caustic and can cause significant damage to the finish. Since acrylic is more expensive than fiberglass, it’s important to clean your shower without using harsh chemicals.

Fiberglass Shower Base

While fiberglass may be lightweight and less expensive, it still has an attractive gloss finish. Unfortunately, there aren’t as many choices for sizes and colors for fiberglass shower bases as there are with the other options. Since a thin gel coat is sprayed onto fiberglass shower bases, the thickness of the finish may vary from base to base. Additionally, the color is only as deep as the gel coat so scratches and nicks will reveal a color that’s different than the finish. Over a period of time, the finish tends to wear and stain and, once stained, is difficult to clean.

Give Your Bathroom a New Look with a New Vanity

If you only have the budget to make one upgrade to your bathroom décor, choose a new bathroom vanity. Yes, you can install a new fancy toilet or an ultra-chic waterfall shower, but nothing will make your bathroom look fresher than a brand new vanity. Not only are they the focal point of virtually every bathroom, but installing a new vanity is a quick and easy way to give your bathroom an entirely new look. Since not everyone has the luxury of a large bathroom and an even larger budget, finding a vanity that fits your space is key. Here are some tips for choosing the perfect vanity for your space, style, and budget.

Why a Vanity?

While the installation of a new shower or toilet tends to require plumbing experience that just adds to the overall cost, bathroom vanities can be switched out and replaced with relative ease. If you’re somewhat comfortable using basic household tools, chances are you can replace a vanity on your own – without the help of expensive contractors or remodelers. With just a little carpentry experience and a passion for DIY, you can have a new, stylish vanity installed in no time. Before you worry about style or color, start by considering the bathroom space you have available.

Choose a Size

If you have a large bathroom, this step is simple. Since you won’t have as many space limitations, you’ll have a lot of freedom and can easily go for that extra-wide bath vanity with oversized mirrors. If you have a smaller bathroom, you may be more limited with your choices, but this doesn’t mean your bathroom has to suffer. A classic trick for making a small bathroom appear larger is to install a pedestal sink with a simple hanging mirror. Pedestal style sinks work well in smaller bathrooms, as they create the illusion of space without sacrificing valuable square footage. If you need extra storage space, hang decorative fabric around the edge of the sink and discreetly store bathroom items below.

Select a Theme

The important thing about updating the look of your bathroom with a new vanity is to select an overall theme. Since vanities are the focal point of bathrooms, it’s important to explore all your design options before making a final decision. If you’re interested in a more modern flair, art deco or black, lacquered wood are good choices. For those interested in more classic approach, traditional bath vanities come in all shapes and sizes, ranging from farmhouse to shabby chic. Fortunately, many retail stores and websites allow you to preview hundreds of different designs before making a final decision.

Pay Attention to Countertops

As with kitchen countertops, those installed in bathrooms should be constructed of a nonporous material. Over time, moisture can ruin otherwise good-looking countertops made of laminate, natural wood, or other materials. While the majority of bathroom vanities are made of nonporous material, it never hurts to verify – especially if you’re repurposing another piece of furniture as a bathroom vanity. Generally, people choose a bathroom vanity that complements their home. If you’re leaning towards an upgrade in the future, some find it beneficial to upgrade in phases – that way you can mix and match styles until you figure out what makes you comfortable. With a bit of time and patience, you’ll have a beautiful bathroom before you know it.

How to Make Your Own Soap

Making your own soap at home is easy, frugal, creative, and fulfilling. The process can be as easy or as complicated as you’d like, and is the only guaranteed way you can control what ingredients go into your soap, onto your skin, and into your body. Whether you’re looking for a more natural alternative to chemical-heavy commercial soap or are just a crafty person interested in a new creative adventure, making soap is a fun alternative to bar soap or liquid body wash.

Ingredients

The best thing about making your own soap is that you can not only control the scent, but the severity of scent as well. Whether you prefer a slight hint of rose or a strong serving of lavender in your soap, you can easily create it in your homemade soap with a bit of trial-and-error experimentation. As far as ingredients go, most can be found in your kitchen pantry:

  • 24 ounces of coconut oil
  • 38 ounces of vegetable shortening
  • 24 ounces of olive oil
  • 12 ounce sodium hydroxide, or lye
  • 32 ounces spring or distilled water
  • 4 ounces of your favorite essential oil, such as peppermint, lemon, rose, or lavender
  • Wooden or heat-resistant spoon
  • Two-cup measuring cup
  • Stainless steel pot or glass bowl
  • Kitchen scale
  • Thermometer
  • Soap mold, shoebox, or wooden box

Although the recipe calls for 4 ounces of essential oil, you can increase or decrease the amount depending on your preferences. It’s recommended that first-time soap makers follow the above recipe one time before experimenting with the severity of scents.

Note: if you’ve never used lye before, read the safety warnings that are on the back of the box. Remember to wear safety goggles at all time when handling lye and raw soap, and never let lye touch your bare skin.

Mix the Ingredients

Measure 12 ounces of lye, and pour the lye into a two-cup measuring cup. Measure 32 ounces of cold water, and pour the water into a large, non-aluminum container, such as a stainless steel pot or glass bowl. Add the lye to the water, stirring gently with a spoon until the lye is completely dissolved. Be sure to open the windows or turn on your stove’s exhaust fan, as the fumes can be overwhelming. Set the mixture aside, allowing it to cool.

While the lye and water mixture is cooling off, measure the oils: use a scale to weigh out 24 ounces of coconut oil, 38 ounces of vegetable shortening, and 24 ounces of olive oil. Combine the oils into a large stainless steel pot on the stove on low-medium heat. Once the oils are combined and dissolved, remove the pot from the heat.

Once the lye reaches 95-98 degrees Fahrenheit and the oils are the same or a lower temperature, add the lye in a slow, steady stream into the oils. Mix for about 15 minutes, or until your spoon leaves a visible trace behind it. Add 4 ounces of essential oil, mix, and pour the soap into your mold.

Pour & Cure the Soap

If you don’t own a soap mold, you can use a soapbox – just make sure it’s lined with parchment paper. Leave the soap covered, undisturbed, and out of air drafts for 24 hours. After 24 hours, uncover the soap and let it sit for another 12 hours. If you measured and mixed accurately, the soap may have a light layer of white ash-like substance on top. This is harmless and can be scraped away. If the soap has a deep oily film on top or has white or clear pockets in it, it cannot be used and should be discarded.

Once the soap-making process is complete, remove the soap from its casing and cut the soap into bars. Set the soap on top of parchment paper on a flat surface for two weeks to allow the soap to fully dry. Turn the soap over after two weeks to let it dry on the other side. Once the soap has been ‘cured’ for one month, use it in your home the way you would any store-bought soap or wrap it as a homemade present for your friends.

Choosing the Best Paint for Your Bathroom

While replacing bathroom tile or tubs may require a professional touch, adding a fresh coat of paint is an easy way to transform your bathroom without a professional’s help. Picking a paint color for your home can be challenging, and one of the trickiest rooms to design and paint is the bathroom. Given the size and layout of the bathroom, you have to be careful not to choose a paint color that will make the room seem smaller than it already is. If you’re thinking about rolling up your sleeves and painting the walls of your bathroom on your own, keep this advice in mind.

Natural Light vs. Artificial Light

One of the things that makes choosing a paint color so tough is the lack of natural light in most bathrooms. Nothing can alter a paint color faster than the overhead and artificial light that’s so common in bathrooms around the world. In order to choose a color that you know will work well in the space, look at the paint cards and color swatches in the bathroom with the lights turned on and off. This way, you’ll know what the color will look like during the day with the lights off, and in the middle of the night with the lights on full blast. If the color works well in both environments, it’s passed the first test.

Look Down

If you’re completely unsure of what color you’d like in your bathroom, look at your bathroom floor for inspiration. For example, if your bathroom tile has tiny specks of color scattered throughout you may want to consider incorporating one of those colors on the walls. By choosing a wall color that compliments or blends in with your flooring, the room will look more put together. If your bathroom floor is carpeted, you may want to consider removing the carpet in the process- future homebuyers may see it as being outdated and unsanitary.

Pay Attention to Location

Another way to select your bathroom paint color is to let your location guide your selection. If you live in a typically overcast area, using a bright, uplifting color can improve your mood and give you a bit of sunshine in the morning. Similarly, if your home is located near a beach or lake, using a deep blue can accentuate the natural blue tones in the sky and seas surrounding your home. In addition to location, think about what the bathroom means to you – if you primarily use your bathroom to take a relaxing bath, consider using dark greys or light blues instead of bright, energizing colors.

Choose the Right Type

Since many of a bathroom’s fixtures produce running water, it’s not uncommon for a bathroom to get humid from time to time. Unfortunately, not all paint types can withstand the level of humidity caused by frequent baths and showers. When it comes to bathroom paint, it’s important to avoid paints that will develop mold or mildew due to exposure to excessive moisture. Many paint companies, such as Sherman Williams, offer paints that are designed to inhibit the growth of mold and milder in the bathroom. For more information, visit your local home improvement store and speak with a paint specialist.

How to Remove Paint Splatters From a Vanity

Removing paint splatters and spots is a common problem, even if you’ve used plastic tarp, painter’s tape, and other protective measures while painting. The real challenge isn’t in removing the paint spills, but it’s in doing so without removing the finish of your vanity. One of a number of solvents might work, and it’s a good idea to start with the mildest one before working your way to stronger solvents that can more easily cause damage. If you’ve tried scraping off the excess paint to no avail, here’s some tips for removing paint splatters from your vanity.

What You’ll Need

When it comes to removing paint splatters from a vanity, it’s a relatively easy task with only a few necessary "ingredients". Here’s what you’ll need before you can start:

  • Mild soap
  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Water
  • Nail polish remover
  • Paint stripper
  • Soft cloths
  • Cotton balls

The best time to remove paint splatters and spills is when they’re fresh. If you’ve waited too long and a skin has developed, you’ll probably find that the paint is too difficult to remove by wiping it with a cloth. If this is the case, follow these steps to remove paint.

Steps to Remove the Paint

The amount of effort needed to remove the paint relies heavily on how long it’s been there and the condition of the vanity surface. Start by cleaning the surface and paint splotches with a mild soap or bathroom cleaner. From there, scrub the entire surface gently with a soft cloth. If the paint is fresh, this may be all that’s needed to remove the splatters. If the paint has already dried completely, it will be more difficult to remove. If this is the case:

  1. Moisten a cotton ball with nail polish remover.
  2. Rub it over the entire surface.
  3. As soon as the paint is removed, clean the surface with cleaner and water to remove any residue from the nail polish remover. (Note: if the nail polish remover is left on the surface of your vanity for too long, it can cause irreversible damage, so clean it off as soon as possible.)
  4. If the paint splatters remain, it may be necessary to use a paint stripper to remove it. Apply it very carefully, and spot check to avoid any damage.
  5. Once the paint is removed, clean the surface as usual.

Other Tips and Advice

To avoid unnecessary damage, always start with the least invasive removal method possible. From there, gradually work your way up to the paint stripper. Additionally, it’s best to spot test a hidden area of the vanity to ensure the products you’re using won’t discolor or change the finish and surface of your vanity. Finally, the longer you wait to remove the paint the more difficult it will be to get rid of. If possible, clean as you go – it’ll save you time and effort down the line.

How to Drain a Water Heater

Most people never give their water heater a second thought – until it stops working. Experts recommend draining your water heater every year, no matter what type of storage tank water heater is currently installed in your home. Regular maintenance helps remove sediment which, over time, can compromise the energy efficiency of your water heater and can cause fixtures throughout your home to clog. Just because clean-looking water comes out of your tank, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s in tip-top shape. To remove sediment, you must completely drain your water heater using these steps.

Check the Pressure-Relief Valve

Before you start draining your water heater, it’s important to check the pressure-relief valve. This valve helps prevent the tank from bursting due to excess pressure. To check this valve, switch off the power to the water heater and trip the lever on the valve in the cold water supply line. Once you have opened the valve, listen for air and look for water. If you hear air and see water, the valve is working as designed and you can move onto the next step. If nothing happens, you’ll have to replace the pressure-relief valve before moving forward.

Run the Drain Line

Once you’ve ensured the pressure-relief valve is in working order, it’s time to run the drain line. To do this, run a garden hose from the water heater drain to the exterior of your home. If the tank sits in a basement, you’ll likely need to hoses: one that runs from the rank to a portable pump, and another that runs from the pump outside. To be on the safe side and protect yourself from burns, give the water in the switched-off water heater a few hours to cool off before beginning this process. Note: taking a long, hot shower is an effective way to speed up this part of the draining process.

Flush Your Tank

Once the water stops flowing out of the hose, open all the hot water faucets in your home and turn the water supply back on. This will flush out any of the remaining sediment left behind in the water heater. Let the water run through the hose until it comes out clear – once the water runs clear, close the drain valve. At this point, it’s safe to turn the hot-water faucets inside your home back off. The heating element could possibly blow if there is no water in the tank. Some tanks may need to be completely full in order to prevent damage, while others don’t. When in doubt, always read the warnings and instructions on the tank label carefully, as water tanks vary.

Finish Up

If the water coming out of the tank appears to be running clear, turn the supply off before closing the water heater drain valve and turning on the cold water supply. At this point, it’s safe to turn the pressure-relief valve back to its original position. Once you’ve done so, restore the power to your water heater and move on with your day, as you’ve successfully removed drained and removed the sediment from your water heater.